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Shop Talk - The Real Estate Agent Podcast


Real Estate Agent Podcast Episode 76: Forging Hard Work Ethic Through Commitment

 Episode 76: Forging Hard Work Ethic Through Commitment
September 22, 2021

Doors Open When You Knock teaches readers to take control over their career so that they can leave chaos and uncertainty behind, creating a real estate business and life that brings joy and fulfillment.

 
[I thought] I should try this knocking on doors thing. And I started and just never stopped. And that became the one thing I did every day, you know, almost every working day and right. Then 125,000 doors later...

Steven Ross

About This Episode

Steven Ross is a REALTOR®, speaker, and author of Doors Open When You Knock. An introvert at heart, Ross committed himself to the simple act of knocking on doors, and 125,000 doors later, Ross has explored what is possible for you, if you are willing to look. His book highlights what it means to take intentional action over time. After all, if you want boundless opportunity and freedom, it doesn't happen by accident — it happens on purpose.

Find out more about Steven at TheStevenRossGroup.com, you can find his book Doors Open When You Knock on Amazon, GoodReads.com, Barnes & Noble, and Target.

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Episode Transcript

Intro: Hey there and welcome to Shoptalk, the real estate show. I’m Brett Van Alstine and on today’s episode we’re joined by Steven Ross, author of When You Knock Doors Open. Steven is a REALTOR® who's been involved in the real estate industry for nearly two decades, as well as a keynote speaker and trainer. Today we discuss the lessons within his book and how applying a committed hard work ethic to any goal can bring success.

Brett:

Steven, thank you so much for hopping on the podcast today and talking with me.

Steven:

My pleasure.

Brett:

So let's jump in for myself and for the listeners. Can you give us a little more background on, you know, who you are and how you first got started in real estate?

Steven:

Sure. Well my, again, my name is Steven Ross and I'm here in Denver, Colorado, and this is my second time selling real estate in a state because I started in 2005 in California, which is where I was born and raised. And I was there for four years. Been here for almost 13 years. I'm in my, everyone's doing the math. This is my 17th year of real estate. And you know, I am absolutely the worst person to be a real estate agent. And they were molding people to be a real estate agents. They did not have me in mind because I'm an introvert. I don't like parties. I don't like any social activities, like no party, no PTA meetings, no volunteering at school. I don't want to do any of that stuff. I'm not online. I don't work nights, weekends. So open houses out for me.

Steven:

You know, and you could almost say I'm antisocial. And yet here I am 17 years later still selling real estate. And you know, by most standards, you know, I've done quite well. I'm not, you know, I don't, I don't make seven figures. That was never my goal to be in real estate. My goal when I got into real estate was March 15th, 2005, I got my license and six weeks later, my third child was born. It was my daughter. And I'm like, wow, I got six. I got three kids to feed and a commission only business. What was I thinking?

Brett:

It's a little bit of motivation for you.

Steven:

Yeah. I mean, well, and that really sets and maybe we'll talk, you know, I don't want to go too far out of order, but you know, we'll talk about, you know, you, this is a hard business. I mean, it's a simple business, but it is hard. And if you don't have a real reason for being in business, you know, you wash right out and, you know, and having three kids to feed isn't necessarily the why, I mean, we all have responsibilities, just don't have children, but you know, we have other things, you know, but I, I didn't want to go back to what I was doing. So like, I was committed to making it work somehow some way. And therefore, if, if I wasn't good at any of those other things, right. And I didn't have a huge checkbook by the way, right. I didn't have an unlimited marketing budget, and social media really didn't exist then.

Steven:

And so what, what the heck was I going to do to be in business? Like, how the hell was I going to make any money? Because I got to find people. And usually you got to talk to people so that they know who you are and they want to do business with you. Right. And I had a coach still have that coach. And he said, it's a simple business, knock on heads, knock on doors, pick one. And I'm like, dude, like really knocking on doors. Like that's for vacuum cleaning people and cable or whatever, whoever those people were, you know, encyclopedia sales, which doesn't exist anymore. But you know, that's what was in my mind, I'm thinking I'm a UCLA grad, I've worked on wall street. I've done it. I started like, I'm not knocking on tourists in any way. And then a few, a few months later, I was like, well, I'm going to be homeless in a few weeks if I don't figure out how to sell some houses.

Steven:

And so I thought I should try this knocking on doors thing. And I started and then just never stopped. And that became the one thing I did every day, you know, most, almost every day, almost every working day and right. The 125,000 doors later. But here I am and worked in two different states and I have knocked a lot. And the book, and I'm not here to tell people they should go door knock. That's not the point. The point is that whatever you're going to do to be successful, you just got to pick one thing, maybe to, you know, you just got to pick something that you can commit to. And, and just don't give up, don't quit. And again sounds well, Steven, that's not Rami, that's the duh like it's porous, but it sounds easy. But then when you go to, when you got to get your current go drive in your neighborhood, get out of the car and go knock on the door, or you got whatever your thing is, you can got to do open house Saturday and Sunday when it actually, you know, that when it matters is when it's time to go do that thing, you know, are you going to do it right?

Steven:

And you know, that's really what the book is about how you figure out what that one thing is. And how do you put yourself in a situ- in an environment that supports you doing what you don't want to do every day.

Brett:

Right. You know, and I think most people would say, oh, you know, focus on your strengths. Don't, you know, try and balance out your strengths and your weaknesses, but for you, it sounded like certainly one of your weaknesses was, you know, being an introvert in a very social industry. How did you kind of tackle that, you know, and ultimately commit to knocking on doors?

Steven:

Well, I mean, there's kind of a lot of questions and I could go a lot of ways with that. I mean, you know, I will say, yes, I am an introvert. And when, I mean, introvert versus extrovert, typically in many people that, you know, there could be many definitions or what people are thinking about it being defined. I think about it as for me besides the fact that I don't want to go to parties and things like that. But if, when I do, when I go to the doors or when I'm leading an event or went on even doing something like this, when I'm on I am using every ounce of energy my body's got like, and went on and done, like when I'm done knocking on doors or when I'm done going to a party, or when I'm done, I am pooped, like I'm drained. And typically extroverts were the exact opposite, right? Until their energy comes from those people. It doesn't mean that I'm socially inept. And I wasn't saying you were implying that, but some people think introvert means you have no social skills and that doesn't always translate. And so fortunately I've had lots of training and development in the areas of interpersonal communication and how to, you know, be a consultant and advisor and, you know, so it's not like I was incapable of talking to people. I just don't like to.

Brett:

Yeah. And that's a big difference. But you know, it's still certainly becoming a hurdle again and real estate is such a social industry. There's so much social interaction that's required. But ultimately, you know, you, you kind of hunkered down and you found a way to, to make it work, which is amazing.

Steven:

It really is. I, you know, here I am working on promoting the book and literally I'm confronted every day with just being in real estate on day one, because what's hard about real estate is there's so many ways to be successful. And so most people, myself included in the beginning and you'd wake up and you're like, well, God, there's so many things I could be doing today. Not just in general business, but you know, if I have a listing to take care of or whatever, there's so many things I could be doing. And then there's, you were not clear about what we must do. And therefore the day just bleeds and here I am promoting a book and it's the same thing. There's so many things I could be doing to promote the book. Right. But there's only a few things I absolutely must do.

Steven:

And it is hard to read. Let me go back to the second. The, one of the reasons why I fell in love is the wrong word, but in a way I did fall in love with the doors is the simplicity of the doors. And that's why I use the doors as a metaphor in the book because it, it really is, is a great example for people to see how simple we can make our business. And when you were at the doors, right? So if I'm in your neighborhood, you know, knocking on doors, you know, driving to, you know, Brett's neighborhood. And she tells me about the neighborhood and like, he's like, oh, you should work in this neighborhood. It'd be a great point. I'm like, oh, okay. So I go to the neighborhood and I get out of the car. There's nothing to do, but knock on, right?

Steven:

There's no bathroom breaks. There's no, “I'm hungry.” There's no, “Let me go shopping.” There's no, “Let me make a phone call.” I don't take my phone with me when I'm at the doors. So there's, there's nothing to do, but what must be done, right. It's so simple. You just get out and you just go down the street. When you get to the end, you turn around and go down the other side, it's elegantly simple. And most other lead generation techniques are not that simple. And so for me, I'm always looking, how do I make it that simple, because left to my own devices, I'm a mess. Just like every other, maybe not every other human beings, right. Where there's so much I could be doing, I could be on Netflix or whatever, you know, whatever your thing is, you know, for me, it's not Netflix, but you know, I'll get distracted reading something or,

Brett:

Well, there's just so many different distractions that you could either have around you or kind of, you know, choose to have around you. But it sounds like you ultimately decided to kind of eliminate those distractions and, you know, focus on this simplistic approach. And it's funny because you think about how most people market today and want to get in front of, you know, potential clients just to ultimately have that face-to-face interaction. Whereas with this method, you're just doing it right away. You're not spending money on ad dollars. You're not spending money on all of these different sorts of marketing materials. You're just doing it going straight face-to-face, which creates that, you know, that great first impression you get a strong, hopefully it's a good, strong first impression. But ultimately that face-to-face interaction is what builds that trust within that relationship

Steven:

100%. Yeah. 100%.

Brett:

Wow. That is, you know, it's, again, it's so simple, but it's something that certainly not many people have thought of in a long time, obviously that used to be the main method of getting out your business and your service. But you know, people kind of shy away from that today.

Steven:

Yeah. And, and again, I'm not here to promote Dornoch and that's not my point, but I do want people to think about this because when you're, I mean, in the end, this is a repeat and referral business I've been around. I've still coached and mentored. You know, I help I work with other agents and I would say my coach has coached more real estate agents one-on-one and the best real estate agents in the country longer than, you know, he's been editing for 30 years. And so I've been around a lot of agents, a lot of agents and doing, and in the end, almost all of them sure. There's exceptions, but the ball right there at least 80 20 is almost all of them have some repeat and referral business, right. In the end, they've built a database. However, they built it. They either had one or they built one. And which means you have a relationship with people. The thing that the doors got me when you're an introvert with no database...


Brett:

Cards are stacked against you


Steven:

And you go out and meet people face to face you are learning you're learning the market. You're learning the neighborhoods. You're learning what people are thinking about their homes. And you're learning to have conversations with people about, about their homes and if nothing else, right. Until it was a great learning opportunity. And secondly, it is so much more impactful to meet somebody in person than it is right on the phone or via text or on social media or something like that. And so I just encourage people. I'm not saying people shouldn't be on social media. I'm not saying people shouldn't do any of those things where you can combine the personal relationship. It's just so much stronger. And in the end, right, when, when we're actually advising our clients in the transaction, it's very personal and they're counting on our ability to serve their needs, not, Hey, I need to get a paycheck, but you know, these people are dealing with something that's causing them to by herself.


Steven:

And I would say that all those doors are right. Is great practice being for them. Right. I was never there to get anything from people. It's like every time, how do I, like I'm going off on a tangent, but there's something I thought of that is a little bit in the book, but I've never talked about really before. And it just kinda came to me, is that one of the things I learned at the doors was that I, you and I can be having a great interaction. And you say you know, I, you know, I spent a summer in LA because in Southern California, because my great aunt lived in Huntington beach and it was Austin. And then I say, well, you know, I used to live in Manhattan beach. And let me tell you, you know, I start talking about me right at your door.


Steven:

And then I realized they don't give a, they don't care about me. I'm there to wait, hello. I'm there for them. It was a great reminder to be there for people. That's what I'm there for to serve others, not there to talk about myself and if nothing else, there's just so many lessons I got. And of course we can do that on the phone. Right. We all, we take someone out to lunch and we realize, oh, holy crap. Not play that conversation. Right. But that was only one lunch. Whereas when you're at the doors, you get lots of opportunities to practice. So yeah, those are just a little tangent, sorry.


Brett:

That's totally fine. No, that's, and that's, that's kind of that blend of the raw and you know, almost a scripted side of it. So that's fine. Well, let's really jump into this journey of, you know, knocking on doors, which I should have said earlier, you must have some catalyst knuckles from knocking on that many doors, but was there a point during that journey? Was there a point during that journey where you realized there almost that aha moment of, I should write a book and I should try and communicate this same sort of the lesson of simplicity and a hard work ethic to others, or what was sort of that that personal journey for you that led to the inspiration of, I should write a book. Yeah.


Steven:

Well, you know, I didn't mention that I've done a lot of personal development work for the last 20 something years right now. Again, I'm introverted. I'm very self-reflective. I'd like to figure out how I can help people. Some people love selling real estate. They just love it. I don't love it like that. I love my clients. Right. I love helping them. And if I can help, you know, and I don't, I don't want to sell a hundred homes a year. That's too much work, I forgot to leave. I'm lazy.

Brett:

Right? Yeah. So you got it, you got so many things going for you.

Steven:

I don't want to work that hard. You know, so for me, I realized that I'm much better, sorry, I'm most fulfilled when I'm making a contribution to another human game. And although the doors you'd be surprised at the difference I've been able to make for people it's not the same as when you're writing a book or leading a training or having a, you know, being called in to speak at an event. And you're causing someone to see their business and their life in a different way. And the book was the way to communicate, what I have to offer to people and for people to know who I am, what I stand for. And, you know, I've been in Toastmasters for 10 plus years, you know? So I had been working on a lot of things and this was just a long combination of figuring out, you know, what do I have to say?

Steven:

And what I realized is that the story of getting to where I, where I am, there was there's something to be said for that, because if you're an agent and you're looking, doesn't matter if you're in business 20 years or three years, or, or what if your business isn't said a different way, if you are not completely fulfilled with where you're at in term, in terms of your revenue and the amount of you're working, right? So if you're working 80 hours a week and you're making a lot of money, that's great, but you don't want to be working 80 hours a week, 80 hours a week, or you're, you're working 80 hours a week and making no money or anything be true, right. It's not imbalanced in some way. Then the book is a way to figure out how do you align yourself with what's most important and stay aligned?

Steven:

And my journey was all about figuring that out. And it just took me a long time. And the book was I felt like I've been around a lot of agents and been around a lot of people that not only contributed to me, but I thought what I learned from them would apply to others. So I really, I really did take, I really, my goal was to create something that was timeless and this isn't like, you know, how to not pick on, you know, Facebook, but, you know, cause it in Facebook was really around 10 years ago and the way it is now. So if I wrote a book on how to generate listings on Facebook, right in a year or two, it's irrelevant, this is not that right. This is a book that's tried and true principles. And what does it take to have a boundless opportunity and freedom, which is the subtitle of the book?

Brett:

Well, I think that's what I find so interesting about this approach is that, like you just said, it really is a timeless thing. That is unless somehow knocking on doors or, you know, face-to-face interaction in general is something completely of the past and the future. And then people don't do that. I don't see this method and, you know, the general mental approach to committing to something and setting your focus on that, whatever, you know, go out of fashion as far as real estate goes or really any in any industry, it doesn't have to be just real estate. And I think that that's kind of another interesting aspect of this book is that it's not, while it is honed around real estate experiences and real estate agents, the same lessons can be applied to any aspect of life. Yeah. But you just kind of, you just have to have that kind of almost those mental, those mental games or that mental gymnastics of figuring out what works for you. And then applying that, and if it doesn't work, then you can kind of, you know, test something different.

Brett:

So for you was, did you try any other methods of, you know, getting your name out there and trying to generate leads before knocking on doors? Or was it always knocking on doors?

Steven:

I mean, I always thought, geez, can't I graduate from knocking on doors like that. I must be able to do something else. And I, you know, I tried an open house. I don't like it. I tried doing more social stuff. It was okay. It's something that I didn't try, but it just, it was harder don't I, I couldn't make it as simple as easy, you know, the, the, the goal for me was, well, let me put it this, let me say good at saying, let me say it a different way. Cause I think about it one way. And then

Steven:

I knocked on doors. My schedule was 11-2, or, you know, in the colder months, 11:30 or noon to 2, 2:30, right. Because Colorado gets a little cooler than it does in California. And, and the only thing I had to do most days was that, that was the only thing I had to do. And then if I had no appointments, right, if you're selling 20-ish houses give or take, you know, 15 to 25 homes, you don't have an appointment every day. Right. Therefore I knocked on doors, I'm free. I can do whatever I want. I did. I did the thing I had to do right now. I can do whatever I want. And it took me a long time to really like what I was doing. But like, I was still feeling guilty, but no, I should be no, no, I, I did what, what really ended up happening is the more agents I got to know him, the more agents I was around especially in Colorado, I just would meet all these agents.

Steven:

And they were always, they had no reliable set that they didn't do business, but they were just, it was haphazard instead. It's not even that they're bad agents. It's just that they had no process. And therefore they just were chasing after everything. Of course they did catch stuff, but the process is so chaotic and leaves them stressed out. And you're always worried. Am I going to sell another house again? You know, when is my next client coming? And if you have a process and you don't have to worry about any of that stuff, because I know the process works. I can't tell you when I'm going to get my next listing or where I'm going to get my next buyer. Right. But I know knocking on doors, not a new thing, but around a long time and it still works. And so I didn't have, once I, it took me a long time to finally settle into, wait a minute.

Steven:

I don't need to worry about it. And in this stuff, it always turns out right. You talk to enough people, people show up, they want to do business with you. And that was, you know, again, that took time to, for it to sink in, but that really was the freedom. Right. So if you want boundless opportunity and freedom, you gotta do what's most important. If you want the opportunity for it. If you want the business to show up, if you want the freedom to be off, and you've got to do the work upfront, you can't just take off in the afternoon and then did nothing all morning and expect business show up at

Brett:

And how it works, how it works. Right, right, right. Yeah. And there's a code, I think I've heard of this before, but you know, the financials are always kind of the lagging indicator of what you do right before that. And that's exactly what this sounds like. Which is just such a great message. I think for so many new agents that want to get out there and that are earning their license today. And certainly feel that overwhelming of, gosh, what do I do now? Like I have my license, but how do I approach this new career that I have? I've learned so much. And now I'm kind of trying to figure out what is really applicable in my day-to-day life and what's not. So for you, not only, you know, developing this method of knocking on doors and forging these relationships with people, but you know, staying organized after the fact and, you know, following up with these contacts and again, developing that relationship over time so that you build that trust.


Steven:

Yeah, I got interrupted because I forgot I'm also terrible at getting up, so right. I'm not even a great self.

Brett:

I was just about to ask. So what's, what's this follow-up process that you have

Steven:

The follow up. I see you twice a year at your door, sometimes three times,

Brett:

That's it?

Steven:

It's the simplest follow-up now here's, here's the difference though, if I'm at the door and you say, “Hey, Steven you know, we, we really are thinking of moving. This house is too small. We've got two kids now. It's, you know, three bedrooms, but it's, you know, only a thousand square feet. We have no basement and she's really tight”. And I said, and it's so where we were recording this in July. And we say, and I say, “Well, so it sounds like, so it sounds like this, this is too small for you.” And you say, “Yeah.” Okay. So it seems like you're ready to make that you absolutely decided that you need a bigger home.

Brett:

Yes.

Steven:

And so do you see yourself? Is this something, I mean, so when Christmas comes this year, do you see yourself in the new house? Or do you see yourself still here?

Brett:

Oh gosh, Steven, you know, ideally we'd be out, but you know, there's just so many things that are going on between now and then, maybe in the beginning of the new year.

Steven:

Okay. So I press a little further, I will do the whole thing, but I press a little further, but as long as you said, you know, by January, February, you know, I'm going to get your phone, I'm going to make sure I have your phone number and I'm going to figure out, you know, what do we know? What do you see as the next step? And I will follow, you know, I will follow up with you. Okay. Now, if you said, “Yeah, you know, I mean, it's not going to be this year, right? We've got some big trips. You know, our parents are going to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary, 30th or whatever, and we've got some trips planned and we've got some other stuff, you know, something we're going to revisit next summer.” I'd again ask you another question. And if it is, in my answers, I get any indication that you would consider moving before the end of the year.

Steven:

I may get your number or info if I don't already have it, but I'm not too worried about following up. Okay. And mostly how I'm going to leave it is I'd say, “Well, it sounds like Brett, that there's just, you know, there's just so much going on this year. There's just no way you're moving this year. Okay. On the other hand, if something changes like some miracle happens and you know, you decide you've got to move this year. Would you mind giving me a call?” Gotcha. And you'd say, “No, I don't mind.” So now I've left it on you.

Brett:

That's part of the process. I see. I see.

Steven:

Now there's other people listening. You're like, that's the worst idea ever to do that. I'm just telling you what I've done, because I don't want to spend a lot of time following up on a phone at a computer, which I hate both of those things. And if I think the odds are low, that you're moving for the end of the year. There's no reason for me to call you. Right.

Brett:

That makes sense. Now, again,

Steven:

I've done this a long time. I've had a lot of conversations, so I'm, I've gotten good at ferreting out. What's really driving someone's decision? Right. You know where they're at. Right. And, and, and then people call me, right. Because I leave them a notepad or I, you know, do other stuff. So, you know, but the point I'm trying to make is, is that right? Even in the follow up, right. I don't want to spend a lot of time. Again. I don't like making phone calls. I don't like sitting inside. I don't like being on a computer, so I don't want to do any of those things. If I don't have to, if the odds are low, that they're moving, why do I want to sit and make, I'd rather just be out at the doors, making my contacts then sitting right at the computer on wherever and also, cause I hate so just as another aside, right, you're sitting here, someone's listening.

Steven:

They're like, well, I am going to make my calls or whatever your choices are right in Colorado there's days where you can't knock, right. It's snowing, it's cold, there's snow on the ground or it's icy or whatever the reason is. Right. And of course over time, eventually I have people in my database and I need to make those calls. And therefore what I would do is I would get in my car. I drive maybe not in the neighborhoods, but somewhere close to the neighborhoods. And I would just sit in my car and I'd say, all right, I've got an hour. I've got to make these calls. And what I really want is to go into Starbucks or my other favorite or any other favorite coffee shop and get coffee. Well, I can't do that until I've made my faults. Right. So it is, it is a version of door knocking, right? I've had to know it's the same, the same methodology.

Brett:

Yeah. But again, even with that, you know, that's your, what's almost called the second second stage of your process. You eliminate the distractions, you get out of your house, get all, all that is out of the waste. You're not distracted, you know, I'm hungry, you've got to go to the bathroom and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, whatever comes up in your head. And then on top of that, there is almost a reward system that you are giving yourself. So I'm going to get X done. And then I get rewarded with Y, which is great. As far as, you know, how I think they are all, most humans function, you know, we want that instant gratification. But if you take it now more often than not, you're not going to get done. What do you need to get done?

Steven:

That's right. Yeah. Yeah.

Brett:

I mean, it's, it's, it's again, I can't, I keep on going back to, you know, the simplicity of it, but more often than not, that is what works for people. And ultimately what this comes down to is just having a very strong work ethic, which is what it sounds like you possess.

Steven:

Yeah. I mean, people say that I don't feel that about myself.

Brett:

You are, you're very modest.

Steven:

But then, what I was good at is creating a system and a process that I could follow. Right. Even when I don't feel like it. Right. And that's really the point. Right? Most of the time I'm never, we, I am never going to feel like doing what we need to do. So how do we create an environment that supports us doing what we say we need to do? Right. Not what we feel like doing. Right. I never, I don't feel like taking out the trash either. I don't feel like cleaning my house, but I do like that. I do like the house having been cleaned. Right. And so the story, the thing I say is, and I heard Somerset man, who's a British writer, I guess in the early 1900s. I forget. Anyway, someone asked him once, Do you like writing? And he says, well, no, I like having written.

Steven:

I kind of write, and I don't like knocking on doors, but I like having knocks. I don’t like going to the gym, but I like having worked out, you know, it's kind of the same thing.

Brett:

Yeah, yeah. You know, everyone, you know, they want that end result without having to do any of it, any of the work to get to that point, I should say. Yeah. So is there anything else that you would like to, you know, tell myself, tell the listeners about the book, you know, kind of gold nuggets almost that you think would be helpful or, you know, enticing as far as wanting people to, you know, get the book and read the book and kind of digest this information.

Steven:

Yeah. Well this is going to sound terrible. Go for it. So the other thing I left out, when you said, you know, what was the reason for writing? What was some of the inspiration behind the book? I kind of alluded to, but this was one of my goals. And it's written as a negative. I don't want to write a crappy book. Like that was my goal. Don't write a crappy book. It wasn't a great book. I mean, which was my goal, but I really had it in my head. Like there's so many people that write books for maybe a reason that I do, but they don't care and I'm not picking on them, but they're like, I could care less. I just want it done. I really wanted to write a book that would make a difference. And the feedback that I've gotten is that, you know, is this book for everyone?

Steven:

No, but for the people who've read it, it really does resonate. It really does ring true. It really does lay out what it takes to be on the path of real estate and deal with all the obstacles we get dealt with all the time. It's just so easy to get taken off track. And if that resonates with you, if you find yourself off track from time to time, then I absolutely recommend the book and I recommend going to Amazon or going to the website DoorsOpenWhenYouKnock.com and get a copy of the book.

Brett:

Right. Right. Yeah. And I think that that's a lot. A lot of agents hit that point kind of that low point of, gosh, am I doing, am I, should I continue to do this? Am I doing something wrong? Like why isn't this working? And it sounds like, you know, taking that step back, maybe getting a change of perspective opening up the pages of this book is a kind of that great that great point for agents to, you know, get that almost that rejuvenation of energy and that rejuvenation of focus and perspective that, you know, will help them get over that hump. Yeah. Yeah. Do you, was there ever any point in your own career where you kind of felt like that where you felt like you had to kind of pull yourself out of the judges, you know kind of grind that out?

Steven:

I can't think of a time where I didn't feel like that

Steven:

Does that feeling doesn't go away? Right? The feeling of right there was net. You know, although I do have a spreadsheet that tracks every time I went to the doors and how many, I know how many doors I've knocked on. I just, it's a whole other story I won't get into, but I just ended up starting counting how many doors I knocked on and being kind of a spreadsheet geek, at least I used to be, am I I'll just start, I'll just keep keeping track. And I never, and that's how I know how many doors I've knocked on. And last, what were we just saying? You said, oh yeah, you said, yeah. So I always feel that way. So when you say you've knocked on 10,000 doors or 20,000 doors at $30,000 at 44 50, and you think you should be somewhere that you're not, well, I should be here by, you know, obviously, but you know, we don't know how it's all supposed to turn out.

Steven:

And so there's, there's numerous times where I'm like, this is a bad idea. I should quit. You know, but of course the more you're in it, right then there's that sunk cost. Well, when am I going to do it now I've knocked on 70,000 doors or 80,000 doors or whatever the number is. And if it really wasn't working, right. I, I for sure would have quit, right. If, if everyone put a no soliciting sign and a video camera and I got to every door and everyone said go away, I would have, right. I would've found something else. And actually what ended up happening. And I'll tell you a short version of this. It's in the book when I got to my hundred thousand stores. So like literally the day or two before I was like 99,900 and whatever. And some guy that night, he didn't even come to the door.

Steven:

I just left a postcard at the door and he left some message at the door. And he said it was like a two minute message. It was long. And it was something like, got your postcard. And first he was off because he didn't like what was on the postcard and blah, blah, blah. But then he said, I think the fact that you go door to door is a terrible idea and you should stop doing it. No one wants you around. In fact, I've talked to everybody on the block and they said, you shouldn't come around either. And then he hung up the phone and I was like, I was pretty upset.

Steven:

I'm like, what's the F like seriously, I'm knocking on a hundred thousand doors. And the day or two before he's calling to say, he's invalidating everything I've just done for 12 years or whatever it was at that point. And I was really conflicted. I was like, I, I was really torn. I'm like, I, I, I don't know. Maybe I was wrong. Maybe this was 12 years of wasted time. And then I started thinking about it and then it dawned on me. I'm like, that guy just moved in six months, months ago. And I looked him up. He was like a plastic surgeon or something. I don't remember. I'm like, there's no way he talked to anyone on the block. He's full of crap. Number one, number two, I know people on the block and I know them very well. In fact, there's lots of people who love when I combine. I know. Cause they're not just saying, I mean, you can tell, right? I mean, everyone's not faking it. You know, if someone doesn't want you around there, they will tell you. Okay. Yeah. and I'm like, yeah, screw him.

Steven:

But it all, you know, the lesson there was that that's when I started taking selfies with people. That's when I realized at that point, you know, I had 20, I can't remember what year that was, but I had already just begun to focus on the neighborhoods. I wasn't just knocking everywhere. I was knocking in specific neighborhoods. And it was about that time. I started to think, I'm like, wait a minute. I don't need to knock if someone's a no, I don't need to knock on their door to turn them into a yes, I can. Just, once they tell me there are no great you know, you'll never see them again. Right. These people love, I need to see these people. These people are the ones who refer to me, who want to do business with me, who are, you know, appreciate the relationship. And it really was kind of a turning point. Right. So it could have been the end in the end. And instead it got me refocused into something more important.

Brett:

Sure. Again, but, and that's it certainly sounds like there was that, that almost that creeping sense of self doubt, but once you replayed the situation in your head and you, you know, thought about the relationships that you had been cultivating it to that point, your self-confidence kick that all out the window. And then, you know, and that's, that's that, there's that, there's the saying along the lines of, you know, feeling anxious for something because you weren't prepared for it, but when you prepare for it, it gives you that confidence and that's that situation to me, that's what that sounds like.

Steven:

Yeah. I kind of used to, I think that was the first time I really owned, you know, I'm like every human being, I have my own flaws and I'm very capable and yet I operate sometimes, like, I'm not capable. Sure.

Steven:

Everyone's got some version of that, you know, that's, I'm very clear. That's one of mine. And so like, there was a part of me that was like, yeah, maybe, maybe. Yeah. But then right. It finally dawned on me like, wait a minute, a hundred thousand north, that's freaking, it's a lot of effort. I've learned a lot. And also again, that's when I began to think about, you know, maybe writing a book, I'm like, there's something here. I don't know what it is yet. Right. There's something to be said for this journey. So yeah,

Brett:

Well, you know, me personally, I'm super happy that you decided to, you know, write this book and document this journey of yours. Cause I think it will be super helpful for, you know, not just our listeners, but anyone that ends up, you know, stumbling upon your book and, you know, being able to read that and have that opportunity. So for everyone out there that is interested, what are some ways that people can connect with you? How can people find the book, purchase the book you know, reach out if they kind of have questions?

Steven:

Sure. Yeah. The book is on Amazon, so obviously feel free to get it there. And the best way to get ahold of me is my website DoorsOpenWhenYouKnock.com. And that is, you know, I have, as I have, I have some social media stuff. I have no idea what's on there because my niece does it. I'm not a social media person. That's not what I do. I'm no good, but people are other people on social media. If they're looking for me, they can find it just don't DM me. You got to go to the website and send me a message.

Brett:

That is good. That's good to know. Well, thank you so much, Stephen, for hopping on the podcast. It was such a pleasure talking with you and getting to know your journey and hearing this remarkable story.

Steven:

My pleasure. Thanks for having me.