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Shop Talk - The Real Estate Agent Podcast


Real Estate Agent Podcast Episode 79: Building a Business Through Strong Leadership

Episode 79: Building a Business Through Strong Leadership
November 2, 2021

Chris Craddock has one speed setting in life: fast. His approach to everything in life is to dive in headfirst, completely committed. His high energy is contagious, which has helped his brokerage garner $167 million in sales last year.

 
Whether you're doing one deal or whether you're doing a thousand deals, I think that everybody should spend between half an hour to an hour a day investing in yourself

Chris Craddock

About This Episode

Chris Craddock is the founder and CEO of The Redux Group, a top-performing brokerage in the DMV. Chris is also the creator of the REI Revive, an agent program that coaches real estate agents on closing sales and growing their business. Chris is the co-host of the podcast Uncommon Real Estate, a podcast focused on educating real estate agents who are also investors. 

You can follow Chris on Instagram @Craddrock and listen to the Uncommon Real Estate on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Buzzsprout.

Episode Transcript

Brett:

Hey there and welcome to Shoptalk, the real estate show. I’m Brett Van Alstine, and on today’s episode, we’re joined by Chris Craddock. Chris Craddock is the founder and CEO of The Redux Group, a top-performing brokerage in the DMV. He is also the creator of REI Revive, an agent program that coaches real estate agents on closing sales and growing their businesses. Finally, Chris is the co-host of the podcast Uncommon Real Estate, a podcast focused on educating real estate agents that are also investors.

Today we discuss Chris’ journey to success, why personal growth is essential for business growth, and the importance of having a momentous start to the day through morning routines.

Brett:

Hey, Chris, thank you so much for hopping on the podcast and joining me

Chris:

Absolutely glad to be here, Brett. Thanks for, thanks for inviting me.

Brett:

Yeah, we're really excited to talk about real estate investing and all of the different ventures you have going on and how you can help real estate agents in the market today. So for our listeners, you are a nationally certified life coach and leadership coach, a top-performing real estate professional, a host of the Uncommon Real Estate podcast, and an entrepreneur. When and where did all this crazy career start for you?

Chris:

You know, I started off, I graduated from college in 2000 and went on staff with an organization called Young Life. I loved Young Life, changed my life. It was amazing. I made $20,000 a year though. It was really, really difficult. So when my wife got pregnant in 2003, I would go to the library and check out every book on investing and actually made 12 times what I made in a year in about four months, which allowed me to continue doing the ministry thing. But then during that time, I always led large, large teams in ministry. And I'd gone back to the thought that I love leading people. I loved helping people accomplish goals. So I went back to school. I got a doctorate in leadership and I guess in 2011, basically, the money started running out again when I had more kids. And so I ended up flipping houses again.

Chris:

And since I had led large, large groups of people, somebody gave me Gary Keller's book, The Millionaire Real Estate Agent, and I read it, and it just struck a chord with me. And you know, I love what Zig Ziglar says, “you can have everything you want in life.” If you help enough people get what they want in life, and whether that's being a team leader, and your clients are your agents or whether you are the agent and your client is the seller or buyer, you know, if you help people get what they want in life, that's how you get what you want in life. It made sense to me. So we started just running and building the team. I think it was in December 2014 that we really started actually building the team instead of just doing it for our investment arm. And yeah, last year we did $167 million both on and off-market and in volume, and 501 transactions.

Brett:

That's crazy, and you really, once you kind of figured it out and found the path that you wanted to strive for you really just dove headfirst.

Chris:

Yeah. You know, everybody, all my friends and family, they joke, I've only got one speed. I'm all in.

Brett:

I was just thinking that in my head, this man just goes, he doesn't have any other speed he's going on. So you just mentioned, you know, the success that your company has seen this past year doing $167 million in sales. Why do you think, you and your company have seen such success and how does this make you feel seeing all this return on your sweat equity?

Chris:

Well, I mean, there's a handful of different things. So each level of success required a different way of thinking. So you know, I do a lot of coaching of agents. And what I say is if you're an individual agent doing less than 25 deals a year, and I know this is going to offend you, that I'm saying this, and I'm sorry, I hope you still like me, but if not, I hope you take to heart. What I'm saying is if you're doing less than 25 deals a year, I think you need to work harder. That’s just where it is. You're not making enough calls. You're afraid to pick up the phone and you just need to smile and dial and call more people. And at the same time, I think that whether you're doing one deal or whether you're doing a thousand deals, I think that everybody should spend between half an hour to an hour a day investing in yourself which is, you know, listening to podcasts like this or something of that nature.

Chris:

You know, the two ways to win this is through activity and skill. So early on I'll tell you, you know, for me, when I first started, I was just like, there's not a day that's going to go by that. I'm not going to get a lead referral or appointments. So some days it's like 9:30 AM and I get my lead referral or appointment. And I'm like, man, I might be the best that's ever done this. And then the next day that goes by, it's like 6:30 PM at night. I've been calling and everybody's been telling me no all day. And I'm like, man, I might be the worst that's ever done this, but it cuts both ways. Right? Like, you know, as long as if you quit the day and say, I want my day, when you got your lead referral or appointment, then you know, after like 5:00 PM, you can't just say, well, I call it a day.

Chris:

No, you just gotta keep going. I remember Gary Keller used to call it “sleeping bag days”, you could bring your sleeping bag to the office and you just don't leave until you get it done. And the funny thing is I talked to one of my good buddies, you know, success leaves clues. So my, my buddy, who does a ton of business, I gave him a call. I'd gotten home. I was cooking. I was grilling. And he called me about something cause I called him earlier, and I was like, “Hey what are you doing?” He's like, “well, I just finished an appointment, but I'm heading back to the office.” I was like, why are you headed back to the office? He said, “I didn't get my deal today, I didn't get my lead, referral, or an appointment.”

Chris:

And I said, “alright, good man.” So that's the deal. Now at 25 [deals], when you start hitting your head against the wall, at that point you need an assistant, right? That's when you need to start having other people do the things that you are doing. Maybe you're good at admin stuff, but you really need to stop doing the admin stuff because other people can do it for you. And I've got a big sign in my office that says, “Are you in your genius zone?”, you need to start working to be in your genius zone. So we've heard the Predo Principle, the 80/20 rule. Well, 80% of your reward comes from 20% of your effort.

Chris:

So if you think about it, let's just say, because it makes the math easier. Let's just say you make $100,000 a year. That means $80,000 comes from 20% of your work. And if you work five days a week, that means one day a week's effort creates $80,000. So when you get to the next level from 25 to 50 and you want to start making more money, then you need to find the things that you were doing in that one day of work that is so valuable. And I'll tell you what it is right now. It's being in front of people. Right? And so when you're sitting there writing up your listing agreement when you're writing up your buyer Broker agreement, when you're putting stuff in the MLS, when you're dropping off lockboxes, that is the 80% that gets you the 20% result.

Chris:

So when you hire somebody else to do that, and then you get in front of people, that's when your income goes up. So, that's where leverage happens right there. And then when you want to go above 50, you need to get somebody to start working with buyers for you. And then you start to outsource the listings. If after you go from like 100 to 200, 300, 400, that's when you just turn the dial-up, once you got the right people in to do that. So that was kind of the, I gave a long, long answer for the question you asked, but that was kind of what I saw as I leveled up each time. I heard a friend of mine use the phrase, “New levels, new devils.”

Chris:

And so every time we would level up, we would hit new devils, new problems that you have to deal with. And then how do you solve those problems? For me, I feel like I could drop in any town in America right now. And I could probably do about 75% of what I'm doing now because I understand that at a granular level, but about 25% of what we're doing still, I'm doing it by, you know, just instinct, but I don't understand it at a granular level. And so that's where we, as, agents need to realize, okay, what is it that gets us the success? We have turned up the dial on those things and then start getting ourselves out of the places that are bottle-necking and keeping us [at that previous level]. Let's go do that now.

Brett:

Sure. That makes complete sense, I think it, ultimately, it sounds like when you're hitting these different tiers and you're wanting to move on to the next level, what is holding you back ultimately, is that time investment of, do I need to be spending time doing this right now? Are there better things I could be doing with my time? And it sounds like, having that face-to-face interaction is really the most valuable

Chris:

Yeah. Until, you get to a place where you're going to level up to that next, where you kind of begin to work on the business rather than in the business. And about two years ago, I spent part of the reason we had a big leveling up was because I spent so much time trying to learn leverage at a high level. I'll give you a handful of books that I literally just dove into and read like, non-stop. One is called, Hey, if you're all right with that,

Brett:

Please, please do. I'll make sure I have on the webpage, I'll have all these listed out with links and everything. But please, the list is awesome. Please go ahead.

Chris:

Yeah. So one of them is called Clockwork. It's written by the same guy that wrote Profit First. And one of the things there that I really loved is he said if you want to level up get a sticky pad. And every time you do anything for two weeks, you just write down what your activity was and post it on the wall. And then at the end of two weeks, start breaking it out and say, what is the stuff that I should not be doing? And then put that on somebody else's plate. So that was one of them. And then the book Scrum, How to do Twice as Much in Half the Time. I think that was really powerful. The 12 Week Year is again another one, because a lot of times we get to the end of the year, we don't hit our goals and we're like, dang it, maybe next year.

Chris:

And you don't realize if you break it down into small little pieces, you win. One of the things I like to say is, “To win your year, you gotta win the quarter to win the quarter, you gotta win the month, to win the month, you gotta win the week, to win the week, you got to win the day, you got to win the morning.” So when you break down your goals, down to the irreducible minimums, then you've realized, okay, if every single day I get my win, like the lead referral or appointments, then I know at the end of the year, I'm going to look back and say, okay, I won. I hit my goals because I did what I needed to every day. So Scrum, The 12 Week Year, and EOS Traction is another really massively great book.

Chris:

And then the last one, this is a new one. So I just read this a few months ago. That was really great, but it wasn't in that short period where I was just going up, but it's just so good. Dan Sullivan's Who Not How, which is, you don't have to know how to do everything if you find the right who that knows how. I'll tell you, you want to talk to me about admin stuff. I'm not the guy. If you open up my underwear drawer, it's not organized by color and it's not all folded. Right. But I guarantee you, David and Lenna [my kids], you open up their sock drawer, their underwear drawer, whatever it is, it’s going to be perfectly organized. And that's not me. So to have a big structure like this, you need to have the right who, that thinks like that and let them do that so that I can do what I do.

Brett:

So it sounds like, you're obviously a go-getter. You're talking about starting the morning strong. What does the average day look like for Chris Craddock?

Chris:

Yeah, so I'll wake up. Depending on the day, I’ve got a couple of different things anywhere from it's either 5:00 or 6:00 AM. I'll tell you the biggest leveling up early on was having a morning routine, right? Success leaves clues, and everybody that I follow, everybody that I listen to, someone's going to tell me at some point, some guy that rolls out of bed at 10, and who does that? Other than like a rockstar, right? Somebody who rolls out of bed at 10, is massively successful. But I've yet to find that person. And so and I'm naturally a night person and I'm a great salesperson. So I sell myself on my own BS, which is part of the reason why for so long, I didn't do the mornings.

Chris:

Because I was like, oh, I'm more creative at night sitting at my computer in my underwear, I'm so much better. I'm not interrupted by my kids. Aren't running in here, but you know, I'm, I'm not tired. I'm not exhausted. It’s all bogus, right? Success leaves clues, all these people that are so much more successful than me, and so much more successful than anybody listening to this podcast. They all have morning routines. Without a doubt. I have people, like successful agents from across the country that I teach. In my team on Friday mornings and do trades with other big agents. And on Friday mornings, one of the questions I always ask is what's your morning routine? I never give them a heads up that I'm going to ask it. But every single time I have a successful agent on there. They always have a really strong morning routine.

Chris:

It just without fail, success leaves clues. So I wake up, I write down my goals because anytime you get into a malaise, or you kind of feel like you're, you're not motivated, it means that you're not close enough to your goals. And I'll tell you if you feel that way now you should really spend some time to unpack that because that was really, really important to me. Then I'm a Christian guy. So I read my Bible every morning. I pray for the people in my life that I care about and the people, my team that they'll have favor and success and blessings. I'll go downstairs to my basement. I work out every morning because I think you've got to feed your body to be ready. One of the habits that Brendon Burchard says, in The High-Performance Habits is that a high performer creates energy and I'm naturally a high-energy person. I'll tell you if I don't feed my body and make my body right, then I'm not going to be able to impart energy into the people that I need to. I have energy in my organization for us to hit the goals that we have.

Chris:

So I work out and at the same time, I am always listening to a podcast or an audiobook because I do believe your business grows to the extent that you grow. And so I want to be also feeding my mind. I think about the athlete right before their game, they're getting in the zone, right? That's what I'm doing in the morning. I'm working out, getting in the zone, I'm listening to something that makes me excited and makes me ready to go, just to get into that zone. I go up I'll have breakfast, oftentimes with some of my kids, I'll take a shower. While I take a shower, I'm listening to something again, an audible book or something to really get my mind going. And then I'll have like a five-minute morning huddle with my wife before I dive into my team's morning huddle.

Chris:

We went from having a couple of training a week to last year during COVID, when we were looking at the world, thinking it was going to shut down. I looked at the Navy Seals. They say that you'll never rise to the level of your aspirations. You're always going to fall to the level of your training. So we raise the level of our training so that every morning we have training with our team. I teach that training three mornings a week and somebody else on the team teaches one. Then I get an outside speaker to teach one morning a week as well. So that our team is always working to the next level up as a group. Then we go get at it, right? Whatever my rock is, my goal for the day. I just go at it. And I really worked to get that done before the afternoon.

Brett:

Wow. That's a jam-packed day, but it certainly seems like over the lifespan of your career that you certainly molded it. And I'm sure that wasn't the day one routine that you had going, but you found that as you went, and it’s important for agents that are listening in, and they're kind of struggling and maybe wanting to figure out how to get that jumpstart, to hear yourself talk about, those little nuggets of information that are almost those lessons that don't have to be learned the hard way when you have so many resources. And there's so much information out there on what very successful people are doing. And like you had said, every single one of those people has a morning routine to build that momentum and get the day started.

Chris:

Yeah. You know Keith Cunningham, who wrote the book The Road Less Stupid? Keith Cunningham is the rich dad from Rich Dad, Poor Dad.

Chris:

I always talk about this with my team. I'm like people don't pay the stupid tax, right? If you make the same mistake you can be wise and learn from other people, or you can make the same mistake and that's just a stupid tax and you pay a price for it. So if you see across the board that all the successful people are doing the same things, then why are you going to think that you're better than them? There are laws in the universe. And when you follow those laws, it works. And if you don't believe it, you try to jump off your roof and hope you don't break your leg.

Brett:

So we were just talking earlier about this, but tell me more about REI Revive. This seems to be your new passion, how can this help real estate agents, and what is your vision for REI revive?

Chris:

So one of the things that happened with me was during my third year or the fourth year in business it was the smallest growth we ever had. So I listened to a guy that I respect tremendously. And one of the things he said was that the problem was he was just working so much harder to get another deal, to get another deal. And that's what I was doing too. I was just trying to get the next deal and then the next deal. But at some point, I as the owner of the team, the leader of the team, or I don't like this phrase, it just sounds kind of, but I'm just saying the Rainmaker, right? As that person, my job is to make your brain right.

Chris:

Which you know, is big. And so he told me, Chris, you no longer can go after that thing. They'll get you the next deal and the next. Cause every time you get one deal, that's a limited amount of time. But again, you need to level up and go after places where you can get another relationship that can get five deals, can get 10 deals, can get 50 deals. And so I started thinking, okay, where are places that I can get 10 deals, 50 deals from one relationship. Builders are one. But, I don't know that many builders.

Chris:

So I was like, well, who do I know? I know investors, I know about investors. I could work, with flippers and help them find a house and help then flip it. That's two deals right there. Or the other side of it is what about these flippers or these investors that are spending so much money to bring in leads so that they could do it. Like if you look at any TV commercial during the daytime you'll see we buy houses group. You'll see them all over the place. Well, what did they do with the leads that they can't close? All of them have tried to work with an agent. All of them have given stuff to an agent. They have a terrible closing rate. But I knew for me personally, because I came from that background, I could close that at a high level.

Chris:

So I built out something with this investment group where I was just closing them at a massively high rate. They send me stuff, and I close them. I send them a referral fee because then a licensed agent in their organization can close it. I realized that across the country, these investors have tried this and it just, they couldn't get it done. So we had a template where I started doing it myself. And then I taught a bunch of my agents on my team, how to close. Laying out what the scripting is, what the dialogue is. The fact that these people that want to talk to an investor, literally have a different mindset than somebody else say, “hey come and list my house.” They literally have a different mindset. So what we’ve learned is the scripting and the objections for those objection handlers, where they say, I don't want to talk to an agent then we were able to build this out. And so that's the program that I've built out is teaching investors and agents, how to monetize those leads that have been just sitting dead and CRMs of these investors.

Brett:

It certainly seems obvious there's a market for it, and I'm sure that this is almost a universal struggle that people have run into and kind of often leads them or leaves them scratching their heads, thinking, gosh, what do we do with, you know, we have all this sitting here that all the sitting potential, but what are we going to do with it? And you obviously figuring out a way to take advantage of those and leverage those, given the experience is pretty remarkable as far as just finding that niche and then knowing how to approach it.

Chris:

Yeah, 100%. And that's the whole thing. If you really believe as a real estate agent, that if you want to build out a massive organization, you have to get a listing so that you can leverage those for marketing reasons. Then it's just incredible because these people are paying tens of thousands of dollars every month to bring in sellers that are raising their hand saying I want to sell. Then you're able to just take those and turn them into listings. The ones that they can't do, it's just, it's a no brainer.

Brett:

So your focus certainly seems to be on helping agents earn success and create their own real estate business. What is a solid foundation, do you think for anyone that's wanting to break into that space?

Chris:

Which part, the like a team leader agent or investor? What, what piece are you asking about?

Brett:

When you're talking about REI Revive and helping agents create these partnerships with real estate investors is there one side that you focus more on or is it more about the networking and the connecting and how to communicate with the two parties? Are you focusing on one party?

Chris:

So REI Revive teaches the investor how to look at these leads, how to make a decision tree, nd when to pass off what the scripting is. Because if you say, “Hey, you want to talk to a real estate agent.?” They all do that. I mean, 50% of our deals, we would have never talked to. So all of that stuff, just, you work on your scripting. I'll tell you words have meaning the way we say things have meaning. And if you are skilled at how you communicate, you're going to sell a whole heck of a lot more houses. And the problem is a lot of people. They just think, “Hey, I'll just throw it out there.”

Chris:

And if they don't want to talk to an agent, then they don't want to do it. But the reality is most of these people are going to sell with an agent. If you were a high producer, get me up there. Let me take a swing. And so that's the whole key here, but then for agents, once they're in, they've got to understand that these people raised their hand to talk to an investor. They want convenience. They need to sell fast. Maybe they don't think their house will sell in the MLS. Maybe they don't want people coming through it. There are five reasons essentially why they want to talk to an investor. So if you know how to speak to those reasons, if you know how to speak to who they are, that all comes to the psychology of somebody that says I'm willing to sell my house to an investor for less than it's worth, because I want convenience. Or I think that one of these other reasons is true. So if you can help them realize that they could probably make more money than they originally were thinking, they can get their problems solved. Then you can make a fortune because you set them up over and over again and just sign them up.

Brett:

So it's really just being able to recognize those opportunities and obviously taking advantage of those opportunities and being able to communicate that to both parties. So they see the win for them in each. So what are skills, do you think real estate agents possess? If they were interested in, you know, kind of expanding and exploring and wanting to reach these new tiers and those new levels and hitting those devils, what are some skills that you think most real estate agents possess that would help them kind of want to launch out and break into the,

Chris:

So I would say this for me personally, there are a couple of things that if you want to grow a team if you're looking to grow a team, which I think is what you're asking right now two things need to happen. One, you need to be working on your personal growth because otherwise if you bring people in and they're growth-minded people, and you're not growing every single day, they're going to outgrow you and they're not going to want to be in your world anymore. So for me personally, one of the things I do is I wake up and I write down my goals and I print them for the people in my world. One of the things I do is think about how I grow, because I personally know that if I don't grow, so I'll give an example:

Chris:

I've got a good friend of mine. He's a, he's an agent. He has a small team. He probably makes like, you know, $500,000 to $600,000 a year, which is a very good amount of money for somebody. And I was talking to him about growth and he's like, “Chris, I don't need to grow anymore. I want to be exactly where I'm at. I don't need any more money. I'm totally good.” This is weird because most people don't say that, but I respect him for saying that. But what I did say was, “Hey, you lead a team. Right.?” And he's like, yeah. And I said, “I understand that you don't need any more money, but let me ask this, are the agents on your team? Totally happy. Have they made as much money as they need to make?”

Chris:

Or would they be happier if they made more money? And he's like, oh, they'd probably be happier if they made more money. And I was like, well, then you decide that you don't want to grow anymore. It's kind of selfish because of these people that put their trust in you to lead them. And you're saying that you no longer want to grow or spend the time to grow because of the fact that you're, you're in a good place, but they're not where they want to go. You're letting them down. And I don't think that that's a good leader. So he took it the way I meant it, which was not in your face to be like, you know, I'm not trying to hammer him. I'm just saying, Hey, you want to be better? You know, this is it.

Chris:

You know, treat your people well. And part of treating your people well is to grow and give them more opportunities. So for me, I think part of the reason I've got so many people in my team right now that are such high-level people. I mean, literally, you spend just a little bit of time with them and you're like, holy crap. I, I just can't even believe that I'm as blessed as I am to be in business with these many great people. But I also know that five years ago, these people would have probably been my friends, but I don't think they would have trusted me with their future. I don't think they would have trusted me with their team because I wasn't the person to manage that yet. And I'll tell you what, if I stop where I am today within the next couple of years, they'll outgrow me. And they'll probably be my friends still, but they're not gonna want to be on my team or trust me for the future. So that's where if you want to have high-level people, you've got to continue to grow and you've got to continue to think, how can I make my world bigger so that nobody hits a glass ceiling and their world stops growing.

Brett:

That's an interesting point. I had never really thought about it from that perspective, as far as being a leader obviously wanting to, you have that trust from the people that work for you and work around you. And part of that trust is making sure that they feel like they're not breaking through that ceiling and they're not hitting their limit. And that they're obviously wanting to continue to be go-getters and go out and hustle and ultimately grind for them to become better people and see more success. I really like that. So looking back at your career, what is one thing you wish you could go back and change or do differently?

Chris:

I don't know, because everything that's happened to me like there's, I'll tell you there was one point in time when I didn't get into too much, but I definitely got in over my head on the investor side. And I saw that we had a lot of success and I was really good at finding off-market deals. So I just kept buying them and buying them, buying them. To the point that I had too many to be able to turn over in a good amount of time. And it costs me a whole lot of time, money, heck my hair was starting to fall out. I was grinding my teeth. It was crazy. We got out of it and I look back and I'm like, man, how much further ahead would I have been if it cost me $660,000 to get out of that.

Chris:

How much further ahead would I be for that? But also that time made me the man that I am today. So one of my mentors says this, “Never trust somebody that doesn't walk with a limp.” And I thought, dang, that's really a great point. And honestly, one of my good friends he's investing in these syndications. And I talked to the guy that runs this syndication it's for apartment complexes and the guy is investing at such a low cap rate which is, you know, capitalization rate. The return was very low and I was like, well, what happens if the market turns with the rate like this? And he's like, it won't, you know, we're buying in a good enough place where we're totally fine. And I'm like, you know, your rates are real Jerilyn.

Chris:

So I said, how long have you been doing this? And he's been only doing it for three years. So I'm like, yeah, your only frame of reference is in the hottest new state market in the history of time. And you're saying, it's not going to turn. That's bad, bad business advice. So I look at that and I'm like, part of it is because I had things go wrong that I think that I'm being pretty conservative on my investments where I'm putting my money when I'm doing. I'm still like, you can tell, I'm an aggressive guy. I want to go build and take territory and all the other stuff. But I also know that if that didn't happen to me, I'd probably be making a lot riskier financial decisions.

Chris:

I mean, I just had a couple of big investment opportunities that could throw money at. I don't understand it well enough to throw that kind of money at, but if that other stuff didn't happen, I wouldn't. So all of this to say, I'm just really thrilled with the place I am in life right now. And even though I've had some really bad things happen, I think they shaped me and built the character that I have right now. So I don't know that I'd really change anything at this point.

Brett:

That's awesome though. I think that that's a testament to not only yourself but kind of where you're at in life and being able to see that entire picture and have that outside perspective on your own life and how you've made the strides to where you are today. And if you didn't have that skin in the game, you certainly wouldn't be able to recognize other opportunities that you made the same mistakes prior.

Chris:

I will say this, if you would have asked me while it was all going on, I would've told you I wouldn't want it to change it.

Chris:

Here's one of the things, I've got six kids and I work hard to try to be a good dad to those six kids. And one of the things I've learned, we've all heard about the caterpillar, right? Like a caterpillar is in a cocoon. And when it comes out of the cocoon, it's struggling like crazy to get out of that cocoon. If you were to take a little knife and open the cocoon a little bit, make it easier for the caterpillar, its wings wouldn't have gotten strong enough and it wouldn't be able to fly, right? So the struggle is what makes the butterfly what it is. And it requires struggle because that struggle is what solidifies and seals the soul for the rest of our future. That's one of those things, like some of you that are listening to this right now are in the midst of the mess and I'm sure you would give anything to get out of it, but I promise you, you get ahead five years, you get out of the middle of the belly of the beast.

Chris:

You'll look back and say, I'm really thankful for the person, the man, or the woman I've become because of the hard times.

Brett:

Well, I think that that's a great note to end this episode on. And Chris, if you want to point our listeners into any direction, if you want them to check out REI Revive or check out your real estate group or any other ventures that you're working on right now that you'd like to give a quick shout out on, please do.

Chris:

So REI Revive, if you're interested, either me or somebody on our team, we'll give you a call and see if this is a good fit for you. Just go to my name, ChrisCraddock.com and just click the apply button and we'll reach out and see if it's a good fit for you. It may not be, but we’d love to help you accomplish those goals. Early in my career, if I liked someone’s vibe, I would reach out to them when they're on podcasts and sometimes they made it harder and sometimes to make it easier, what I've done is I just said, at least for this point in my life I'm going to reply to every DM on Instagram. So if you go to my Instagram @Craddrock, C R A D D R O C K, not my last name, but an old cheesy high school nickname @Craddrock.

Chris:

Then if you send me a DM, I'll reply, I do get a bunch of them, so it may not be within 24 hours, but give me a couple of days and you'll get a response back. I'd love to help you in any way I can. And then three, the last thing is I know that the average podcast listener listens to seven podcasts. So keep listening to this one, but I'd love to be one of the other seven. And so I have a podcast called Uncommon Real Estate and the whole idea behind it is for the agent who is also an investor. So we work on things to be better as an agent, but we also talk about how to invest because I really do believe one of the biggest problems with real estate agents today is that they're only looking towards the next transaction and not looking to build wealth. And the only way to build wealth is to buy properties and invest in real estate. And you're an expert you need to be investing in in the area. You're an expert.

Brett:

Awesome. Cool. Well, I'll make sure to, I'll have links out to all of that. I'll make sure to plug your podcast and your Instagram and any other links and profiles that you have going on right now. So thank you very much.

Chris:

Thanks so much. This has been awesome, it’s been fun.

Brett:

It's been a pleasure having you on. And I think our listeners would really benefit from all of the information that you just dropped.

Chris:

Thanks so much.

Ad Spot:

After the break, we’ll learn more about REI Revive, Chris’ approach to coaching and training his team, and the lessons he’s learned throughout his career in real estate investment.

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Brett: That’s it for this episode, thanks for listening! If you enjoyed the podcast, you can subscribe to us and leave a review on your podcast player of choice. Shop Talk is a production of The CE Shop.