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What Dolly Parton Can Teach Us About Real Estate
March 8, 2021

What Dolly Parton Can Teach Us About Real Estate

by The CE Shop Team

We Can All Learn a Lesson From Dolly

Although she’d likely disagree, Dolly Parton is the perfect two-word response to the question of why you’re happy to be alive today. It doesn’t matter who you are, what country you’re from, or even if you’re one of the misguided souls who somehow have acquired a disdain for country music: There’s still a lot to learn from one of Tennessee’s most beloved natives, especially if you’re in the real estate industry.

Humility and Persistence

Growing up, Parton would describe her family as being “dirt poor” but even that might be an understatement. Parton was born in 1946 in a one-room country cabin that sat along the banks of the Little Pigeon River in eastern Tennessee. Rumor has it that her father paid the local doctor with a bag of cornmeal. As if that weren’t enough, she was one of twelve children.

However, that didn’t stop Parton. The fame-bound singer began performing at a young age, making radio appearances on local stations, and performing at church. When she was 13, she made an appearance on the Grand Ole Opry where she met Johnny Cash. Cash encouraged a young Parton to be herself.

A few years later in 1964, Parton graduated from Sevier County High School and immediately moved to Nashville to pursue her musical career. She was definitely getting noticed, however, she was told that her voice wasn’t fit for country music and that she should stick to pop after signing with Monument Records. But she persisted, earning several spots on country charts, forcing the label to change its position.

Eventually, Parton was invited to join the Porter Wagoner show where she replaced Norma Jean — a country music master in her own right. She was so beloved by country music fans that Parton had a hard time winning over the audience, who’d sometimes chant for Jean’s return. Still, she persisted, putting herself out there with everything she had, drawing on her humble upbringing with songs like “Coat of Many Colors”, and eventually became one of America’s most revered artists.

Of course, that’s far from the end. Throughout her life, Parton faced hardship even as she became a worldwide icon. The way she overcame those challenges, however, and continues to give back makes it impossible not to admire Parton. To hear it from Parton herself, we highly recommend listening to her powerful, humbling, and inspiring podcast, “Dolly Parton’s America”.

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Image source: Redferns

Nashville Real Estate in the ‘60s

When Parton got her start in the mid-sixties, the average cost of a newbuild house in the Nashville area ranged from $12,500-$17,500. That’s equal to $105,370-$147,518 in 2021 when adjusted for inflation. Today, the typical home in the Music City will set you back roughly $316,078.

What We Can Learn From Dolly Parton

In the world of real estate, adversity and criticism is a regular occurrence. Like Parton, it’s important to follow your intuition, be persistent, and be true to yourself. To quote the legend, "You gotta keep trying to find your niche and trying to fit into whatever slot that's left for you or to make one of your own."

Country music and real estate are both a people business where people want to work with and hear from real people. Sure, you might face a few setbacks from time to time, but if you’re like Dolly Parton, you’ll stick with it. In life and in real estate, you succeed by being genuine, hardworking, and big-hearted. If you need more inspiration to get out there and be your best self, we’ll leave you with some thoughts on life from the icon herself:

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*Hero image source: Los Angeles Times

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