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Houston Home Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Sale
August 16, 2021

Houston Home Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for Sale

by The CE Shop Team

Is This Unique Usonian Home the Wright Price?

Frank Lloyd Wright is one of the most well-known architects in our country’s history, and for good reason: His impact on architecture was monumental.. So, when this Usonian abode designed by the architectural icon himself was listed, heads turned and wallets opened. 12020 Tall Oaks Street is Wright’s only Houston creation, and it’s properly listed on the market for $3.1 million, represented by R. Clay Joyner of JPAR-The Sears Group. 

Before we explore this historic estate, let’s talk about what Usonia actually means. “Usonia” was a word coined by Wright around 1900 to describe architecture that “addressed the need for affordable middle-class housing while employing a simple design…”, per History Colorado. So, what’s the history of this Houston Usonian wonder, and what does it have to offer its future residents?

Wright’s Houston Home Project

Frank Lloyd Wright designed this home in 1954, and it was later built in 1955. Locally, this home is known as “William Thaxton House” after its owner. William Thaxton was a successful insurance executive in Houston who had commissioned Wright to design a work of art that was also suitable for living and entertaining, and thus the Houston house was born.

Part of Wright’s Usonian home series, 12020 Tall Oaks Street was designed in the shape of a parallelogram and constructed from concrete blocks. The home’s shape was designed around a “diamond module” utilizing 60-degree and 120-degree angles only. The skylights throughout the home are equilateral triangles and are placed in each corner at 60-degrees.

Frank Lloyd Wright Houston Home
Source: Compass

Being the quirky, stubborn, and detail-oriented mastermind he was, Wright designed all of the furniture himself — and proceeded to anchor each piece of furniture to the walls so that future homeowners couldn’t rearrange his vision.

This home is yet another stunning display of Wright’s approach to architecture and the marriage of constructed space with the nature surrounding it. Notable characteristics of this style of home include:

-        Angular design
-        Sun-filled interiors
-        Large family room

12020 Tall Oaks Street embodies Lloyd’s dream of a peaceful, private, and relaxing home atmosphere with an emphasis on privacy and living in the present. 

Home features:

-        8,702 sq. ft.
-        6 bedrooms
-        6 full bathrooms
-        1 partial bathroom
-        Library
-        Two fireplaces
-        Pool

Houston Housing Market

Houston’s housing market has been red hot, with home prices up 11.5% compared to last year, selling for a median price of $290,000 as of publication. As the market currently leans in favor of sellers, it made perfect sense to list this Frank Lloyd Wright art piece during the height of one of the hottest housing markets in years. Potential buyers interested in the unique property should be prepared for competition amongst others who value Wright’s work, but on average, Frank Lloyd Wright-designed homes will be on the market for over a year.

 “It is not unusual for a house to be on the market for about 18 months,” said John Waters, preservation programs manager of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy. “It can be much shorter or longer, but there are always articles about why it takes so long to sell. It’s only because a Wright home is so visible.”

Here’s to hoping that the Wright homeowner is able to snag this impressive piece of history!

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